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Tutorials & Guides
Rare is the camera kit that has no accessories hanging off it. Monitor, lens controller, wireless transmitter, signal converter, timecode clock, focus rangefinder -- sometimes the camera can barely be seen under the accessories. These devices need power, and often the cameras themselves do not have enough outputs available. Switronix has created several versions of the JetPack, a battery mount (Anton Bauer or V-lock) with multiple power outputs in a variety of useful voltages.
Tools, Charts & Downloads
The Phantom Flex4K from Vision Research is a significant evolution of the Phantom high-speed camera line. In this article, we've answered some of the most commonly asked questions regarding Phantom and the groundbreaking, new Flex4K camera.
Tutorials & Guides
Many crew members need to see the live camera feed but want to be mobile on set, not tied to the video village monitor. To help facilitate this, AbelCine has married the popular Teradek Bolt to the equally popular TVLogic VFM-056WP LCD monitor.
Tutorials & Guides
To camera people like ourselves, the term Auto White Balance usually brings to mind that little AWB button on many camera systems. When you press the button, the camera tries to adjust its RGB gain levels to make white things in your picture actually white. However, this is not the only place on set where white values are important. A properly calibrated monitor is essential to ensuring what you see on set is what you'll actually get back in post.
Tutorials & Guides
A cinematographer and lighting designer by trade, Rick Siegel has worked on feature length and short films in the narrative and documentary genres. He photographs episodic television series as well -- in music, comedy, fashion, home style, reality and magazine formats. In this blog, he tells us all about his Sony PMW-F3 rig.
Tutorials & Guides
With more and more cameras shooting in flat-looking Log modes or RAW, the topic of LUTs on set and their implications in post have become big points of discussion. At the same time, there are many cameras that utilize the more traditional Scene Files for control of color and contrast. Furthermore, there are cameras like the ARRI ALEXA and RED EPIC that offer their own unique types of image control. With all these different formats, the difference between LUTs, Looks and Scene Files can be confusing, so in this article I explain the terms and discuss how these files are applied.
Tools, Charts & Downloads
Just as we have done for other cameras in the past, we've put together several custom profiles for the C300. Many of the looks are the same as those found in the Sony F3 and other cameras that we support. The C300 has several great default looks that can always be used. However, our profiles attempt to match other popular cameras, or give you the best performance in a given situation. We put together seven different files for you to choose from, which are outlined below.
Tech News
A few years ago, one of our Phantom customers asked us to solve a problem: how could handheld sports shooters using a Phantom v640, which lacked any on-board controls, perform basic functions without being tethered to a computer, which was the only existing way to control the camera at the time? Figuring that it should be possible to use a micro-controller to communicate with the camera to accomplish this goal, I started working on a solution in my spare time. Using a development board wired to the camera with some buttons and some custom code, the result was a box that could be velcroed to the side of the camera. It could perform black balance and white balance, as well as switch to some frame rate and shutter presets. The device worked pretty well and was used to shoot a number of sporting events, prompting clients to start asking for "Jesse's Box."